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of texas does recently because of the leadership though shown by george w. bush, is that when you look at states like arizona, not typical in arizona, but i was just thinking alabama, arkansas' next. if you look at arizona, if memory serves arizona export something like $50 billion a year. if you look at texas can we export $206 billion a year. 35% of those exports go directly to mexico. i think george w. bush understood the tenuous but important relationship that has to exist with our neighbors to the south. i think he was very strategic and smart in building and growing and fostering a relationship over time. and today, texas is benefiting from his leadership back then. a large proportion of the hispanic owned firms in this state and minority owned firms in the state are actually owned by mexican nationals. and so this didn't happen by accident. it happened because very strategic visionary leadership happened two, three decades or a decade ago. now we are benefiting from the. >> creating an environment. >> absolutely. doesn't happen overnight. now you see other states beginning to re
on their taxes. >> up next, george w. bush institute resale the series of discussions looking at immigrants contributions for america. this panel focuses on the economic effects of naturalization. from dallas, this is about one hour. >> a pleasure to be here. i worked for closed with president bush when he was in the white house trying to advance immigration reform in the last battle and so it's a pleasure for me to be back in his beautiful new house, talking about immigration. so thank you to this institute. i want to harken back as we get started to the ceremony that we saw this morning combat incredible moving ceremony because what we're going to talk about here today is not just out immigration is good for america, but have naturalization and citizenship actually even ups the ante and makes immigrants even more beneficial for the united states. to benefit themselves, but it's also a benefit for the country. so the very people we saw this morning when they came in the door, they were great for america but as they went out the door their even more. they will be even more of an asset. we w
served as the chief economist of the council of economic advisers under president george bush. manuel pastor is the professor of sociology in american studies and ethnicity at the university of southern california. he's also the director of their program on environmental and region aleck bity -- regional equity, and for our purposes today most importantly, codirector of the center for the study of immigrant integration. and he's published a couple of reports recently that he'll bring to light today about the importance of citizenship. jose antonio vargas is a pulitzer prize-winning journalist, film maker and the founder of define american, a campaign that seeks to elevate the immigration conversation. he is another profile in courage. in 2011 in "the new york times" magazine, he publicly revealed himself as undocumented and shared his life story of being raised by his grandparents in the u.s. from the age of 12 when he left his birthplace in the philippines. he has since become a national immigrants' rights advocate and leader for comprehensive immigration reform activist including th
for. george w. bush had done that i think he would've been, we would've been heard cries of impatient. we had part of our immigration laws suspended by the president. there's just a variety of issues like that when he is gone outside. we have tension with our system, struggles between congress and the president. this one is very safe. i think you'll see it continue. but there will be legal cases. >> i'm going to try to bounce around a little bit but again we will get to everybody. >> i was a little concerned to find that you are not in support of making the continuing resolution contingent upon removing what optional spin you move on obamacare. i feel very strongly. i speak from a point of view -- [applause] >> i think they do, too. >> this is not theoretical for me because two weeks ago today my husband and i paid in cash for our son had major surgery. for our procedure. but, you know, what? that's a price i paid for the liberty of my children. i'm self-employed. i understand the consequent of that as i've limited options thanks our government on insurance. i understand that i paid f
the reasoning behind why george bush wanted to sell the ports and did he contact beforehand? >> host: i think he is referring to, 2004 at the dubai company wanted to buy a port in the united states. >> guest: i certainly remember that. >> guest: we consider privatizing the ports here in norfolk. we had several bids but i think in the fullness of time i decided to keep it stayed on. >> host: what does that mean? >> guest: there was a reason i sent and the caller, that's also true. the color i believe is referring to when there was a discussion here locally about actually selling the port to a company that was foreign controlled and that came to a full hault. >> host: what does it mean to you guys that this is sustained sustained-state-owned entity versus a private company? >> guest: frankly is run in the public good and if it's privately-owned you have to maximize short-term profits. if its government-owned we can look at the long-term benefit to the commonwealth of virginia and i think that is the one thing i am delighted that we did not sell. just being responsible we had to consider all of the
for and what you were responsible for. >> guest: i served under but george w. bush administration and was appointed by the transportation secretary norman. and as you may know, he is a democrat who served in the republican administration and he was responsible for offering and then congress passed a reorganization act that led to the creation of this agency. and this agency fmsa receives a million daily shipments of hazardous air, land, truck, and sea, dessel and pipeline. >> host: you're current work with the national transportation advisers, what is that? >> guest: i am a lawyer by training and we also have a consulting practice. so, we talk infrastructure projects, transportation projects to both public and private sector clients. >> host: is one of your clients keystone xl? is anybody supporting trans canada? >> guest: no, sir. >> host: as far as keystone xl is concerned, the decision that you were taking, where do you stand if it shouldn't be built on the extension we've been talking about? >> guest: i've been monitoring this for several years. when i was at the d.o.t. the or
, and that is former president george h.w. bush. i've had, i had a chance to work with him, incredible leader, an incredible human being who has given so much back to the community. as president of the united states, but as former president of the united states. so i am honored to stand in for him today. he apologizes, but -- [laughter] we've been talking a lot about work force and whether we have the right people in lace to provide the services -- in place to provide the services. you're the front line. you're the absolute front line. and for people to be able to get quality, affordable health care, they have to be able to come through that door and be accepted and have confidence that they're going to be treated with the care that they expect. and you have provided that. and you have done that as a volunteer. which is just remarkable from the point of view of if we could clone you and have you throughout -- [laughter] it would make life a lot easier. we've talked a lot also about how do you get people into the system, and you personally have gotten people into the system because of the mann
terrorism was partially because george w. bush hated in the muslim world. despite his speech in cairo, despite his efforts to close guantanamo, despite his elimination of the use of the term war on terror, al qaeda continues to hate america. and even as i speak to you here today, they continue to plan attacks against america here and around the world. the president's not alone in failing to confront these threats. i'm afraid because of the success we've had in preventing another attack on the scale of 9/11, some of our leaders in both parties have been lulled into a sense of false security. i certainly support the privacy rights and expectations of all americans. but my colleagues, i also know for a fact that the surveillance programs that our government used have prevented attacks and saved american lives. i think it's a mistake to dismiss privacy concerns as crazy. after all, we have a government whose tax collecting agency targeted americans because of their political views. but it's also a mistake to exaggerate them. after all, if a known terrorist is e-mailing or calling someone
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8